Quantification Methodologies

ecoPartners has played every possible role relating to methodologies for forest and other land use projects under the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS). Our team of experts has authored methodologies, validated methodologies (as third-party validators), and implemented projects under numerous project methodologies and standards. ecoPartners is a recognized expert in methodology development.

Our experience with project development gives us a healthy appreciation for the difference a good methodology can make. We begin methodology development by clearly defining protocols and requirements, often partnering with developers who understand the technical and practical aspects of project development and who are likely to implement the methodology. The focus of our methodology development work is to prescribe specific, unambiguous procedures and requirements that are easily understood by both project developers and third-party auditors. We measure our success by the clarity of the methodology and the speed with which projects can be implemented.

Our track record of successful methodology validation enables us to help our partners navigate the methodology validation process. We assist with overall validation strategy, soliciting and reviewing proposals from validation bodies, and managing the logistics of the validation process.

 
 

Our Methodological Contributions

EP Carbon is the lead author of the Methodology for Avoided Ecosystem Conversion.

This methodology pioneered by Wildlife Works provides a means to quantify net GHG emission reductions and removals from project activities that prevent conversion of forest to non-forest and of native grassland and shrubland to a non-native state. Version 3.0 differentiates between eight baseline types based on the type of ecosystem, the proximate agent of conversion, the drivers of conversion, whether the specific agent of conversion can be identified and the progression of conversion. A single project may include one or more baseline types. 

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EP Carbon is the lead author of the Methodology for Coastal Wetland Creation.

This methodology quantifies the greenhouse gas benefits of wetland creation activities. The scope of this methodology includes two primary project activities – substrate establishment and vegetation establishment – typically implemented in combination in order to create new wetlands (ie, to restore wetlands that have degraded to open water). The methodology also allows for implementation of either project activity individually.

The methodology also addresses the potential for the establishment of woody vegetation. As such, this methodology is categorized as a Restoring Wetland Ecosystems (RWE) + Afforestation, Reforestation and Revegetation (ARR) methodology.

The methodology assesses additionality using an activity method.

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EP Carbon assisted with the validation of the Methodology for Improved Forest Management through Extension of Rotation Age.

This methodology quantifies the GHG emission reductions and removals generated from improving forest management practices to increase the carbon stock on land by extending the rotation age of a forest or patch of forest before harvesting. By extending the age at which trees are cut, projects increase the average carbon stock on the land and remove more emissions from the atmosphere.

This methodology is applicable to managed forests where clear cutting or patch cutting practices are implemented in the baseline.

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EP Carbon assisted with the validation of the REDD+ Methodology Framework.

This methodology provides a set of modules for various components of a methodology for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). The modules, when used together, quantify GHG emission reductions and removals from avoiding unplanned and planned deforestation and forest degradation. This methodology is applicable to forest lands, forested wetlands and forested peatlands that would be deforested or degraded in the absence of the project activity. The methodology includes a module for activities to reduce emissions from forest degradation caused by extraction of wood for fuel. No modules are included for activities to reduce emissions from forest degradation caused by illegal harvesting of trees for timber; such a module may be included in the future. The methodology also includes a module for activities that include forest regeneration.

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EP Carbon assisted with the validation of the Methodology for Improved Forest Management: Conversion from Logged to Protected Forest.

This methodology quantifies the GHG removals generated from preventing logging of forests that would have been logged in the absence of carbon finance. This methodology is applicable where the baseline scenario includes planned timber harvest, and under the project scenario, forest use is limited to activities that do not result in commercial timber harvest or forest degradation.

This methodology is applicable to tropical, temperate or boreal forests.

The latest revision of VM0010 includes mechanisms to quantify the emissions resulting from establishing forestry infrastructure (eg, clearing roads, skid trains and log landings), as well as the fossil fuels from forestry machinery including mechanized felling, skidding, forwarding, haling, loading and transporting the wood products inside the project area.

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EP Carbon assisted with the validation of the Methodology for Carbon Accounting for Mosaic and Landscape-scale REDD Projects.

This methodology quantifies the GHG emission reductions and removals generated in mosaic and landscape scale REDD+ projects by allowing such project activities to be combined with improved forest management, afforestation, reforestation and re-vegetation activities, as well as clean cookstoves initiatives. This allows for a more holistic landscape approach to REDD+ activities that integrates efforts to protect forests with programs to improve the livelihoods of rural communities.

This methodology is applicable to forest that would be deforested in the absence of the project activity. Deforestation and degradation in the baseline would be caused by 1) conversion of forest to crop-land or grazing land for small-scale farming, 2) conversion of forest land to settlements, 3) logging of timber for commercial sale, 4) logging of timber for local and domestic use, 5) fuel-wood collection of charcoal production or 6) forest fires.

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